Covering ducts during construction

| by Luis Imery
Covering ducts during construction

HVAC equipment is generally installed early in the construction cycle of a home. At the very least, before the drywall is put up.

One thing that builders should be mindful of is protecting the duct system as well as the integrity of theair handler and coil in your HVAC system during construction. By taking the simple measure of sealing your duct openings you can create a wealth of positive effects. Primarily, dirt, dust, fumes and other contaminants will be kept from infiltrating your duct work.

This will improve indoor air quality for the home buyer. No one wants to breathe in the sheetrock dust, sawdust and paint fumes that go into building their new home. On top of air quality, covering openings in your HVAC system during construction will keep larger dust, dirt and other particles from compromising the integrity or efficiency of your coil and air handler. A dirty evaporator coil can be very costly. As dust and other contaminants build on the coil the Freon can no longer evaporate properly, which greatly reduces the efficiency of your cooling system.

The coil will surely see plenty of buildup in its lifetime, so prevent the process from starting early by covering your ducts during construction.


Topics: Building Green, Indoor Air Quality



Luis Imery
Luis Imery, through his business the Imery Group, is a full service construction, home energy performance, green certification and real estate group specializing in infusing sustainability in every facet of the real estate cycle. Its construction division has become pioneers in the Athens, GA area in green building of speculative, custom and design-built construction. Just in 2011 they have over 110 units slated for green certification under the EarthCraft program. wwwView Luis Imery's profile on LinkedIn

Sponsored Links:


Related Content


Latest Content

Get the latest news & insights


NEWS

RESOURCES

TRENDING

FEATURES

Social Entrepreneur on the leading edge of best practices for the Tiny Home movement

RESEARCH CENTERS